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just getting a paycheck, you really don't understand how government can affect that firsthand. that was one of the things that led me to think this is a useful idea for a book. >> overall, philosophically, how do you see the role of government, the role of congress, the role of the president in the economy? >> basically this book raises and answers the question. we need government to create a stable environment for businesses to function and create jobs. when government battles too much in the economy, its policies are driven by politics and markets are driven by individuals and the real world music people. that's the difference between what government does about markets do. you need government to protect us from fraud, from wrongdoers. there are wrongdoers the government can protect us from them. overly meddlesome government goes to fire and you end up suppressing enterprise and innovation and job creation. >> 2008 financial situation and the so-called bailout. are you supportive of that government intervention? >> release the question and answer of the book basically. you ca
priority and they have the full support of her majesty's government and the brilliant words they do. >> this is helping tax my own party headquarters and my own party members. i thank the executive to get to that. a recent attack on party colleagues and offices and constituency offices and staff threatened intimidation from loyalists, and if confirmed, all threats of political motivated violence will be triggered by republican attacks. >> discussing this for mr. david this morning, if it is unacceptable, all that staff were intimidated in any way comment and i know that the justice minister and i will continue to defend the ability of politicians in northern ireland to carry out their duties. >> questions for the prime minister? dr. julian lewis, number one, mr. speaker. >> before i answer my hon. friend's question i am sure the house will wish to join me in thanking the duke and duchess of cambridge on the wonderful news they are expecting their first child, the perfect piece of news to end and in court a -- extraordinary jubilee year. joining the question on afghanistan veteran gl
.s. government. it looks just like 1/4. it was only made 79-81 for three years. it was the last regular issued government issued coin they made the san francisco mint uncirculated condition with the proof. it had all kinds of problems. it makes it a commercial failure but makes it a collectable absolutesaffordable at $129 and a customer pick but $109.95 the most affordablen set released by the u.s. government of all the coin sets we have. the 1999 season the anthony. most people do not even know that coin exists. it was not in the proofset and not man said. that coin you gotta individually--mint- set coin! these, $79 apiece.are $109 across the board for everything that you see. >>host: explain where you get numbers. >>guest: i talked about getting individually and the reason is pretty simple. people buy coins individually to build their sets. when i say if purchased individually that is the way most people put their coins together. the coin catalog they are the lord largest coin catalogers kind of the gold standard and has always been there. that is the reference point for retail coin p
of these are entrepreneurs who are not seeking special government leaders. the big banks, the goldman sachs of the world were all internet government and the government itself is mandating the purchase of these credit defaults on its and other devices which ended up bringing down the economy. it's not procapitalist to support goldman sachs and the internment embrace of the department of the treasury. >> is supply-side economics is quick >> surprise side economics is true economics. i actually am quite excited to have mitt romney running for president because they & co. was one of the providers of the foundation of supply-side economics. they apply to business. they showed the most effective way for businesses to gain share -- market share to cut their prices. we will cut prices that their business market share because costs are out by about 20 to 30% with each doubling of total units that were sold. the cost in general, economies of scope and scale of learning is called a learning curve. this is really the foundation of supply-side economics. why when you cut taxes, which are just like a prize, you reduce co
think the federal government will be on each of the following issues. we read a list of these issues, we rotated those. this is how it basically stacks up. ensuring long-term future of entire programs such as social security and medicare, 65%. 64% creating jobs, 64% improving public education, growing the economy, creating a business environment that allows for innovation. lowering the federal deficit actually false down to 40. not as much confidence there as a part on the other side. we been said the training faces a number of challenges including but not limited to large budget deficits, national debt, slower economic recovery, high unemployment, deep political divide on many issues. do you believe we will overcome these challenges in the foreseeable future as we've done in the past, or do you think these are unique set of challenges that are so serious that we might not be able to overcome those challenges? two-thirds of voters, 67%, say we will be able to do that. 31% have concerns about it. look at the bars across the bottom. the ones like younger voters, 18-29, confident we'll get
, and the government is fully committed to making that happen. >> [inaudible] pruitt. >> the prime minister obviously believes within the leveson report, there exists something that is bonkers. how would the prime minister give the views of his planning minister who has said tens of thousands of new homes will have to be built on greenfield sites. >> i think it is absolutely clear, yes, we should build on brownfield land, yes, we should try and deal with the problem of empty homes, but we do have to have a conversation about the need to build more flats and more houses, where we don't have the current situation we have where if you don't have the help of mom and dad, people are in their mid 30s. all credit to the planning minister for trying to fix this problem. on the issue of leveson, i actually think there's a wide degree of agreement about what a new regulatory system ought to look like. it's set out there in black and white in leveson. we need to challenge the press to introduce it and, if they don't, obviously, we have to take further action. >> with more men in work than ever before, with more
not raise the adequate amount of wheat that he wanted to. because the government had decided they were going to control wheat plantings. and so what he said was, okay, then i can raise wheat for my chickens. and he took it all the way to the supreme court and lost that battle. >> host: why do you recount that story in "the debt bomb"? >> guest: because it's a great example on the enumerated powers and the unwinding -- why do we find ourself in the place we're in now? how'd we get here, what do by -- we do about it, and what are the ramifications? the greatest way for the government to make something expensive is for the government to make it affordable. and all you have to do is look at the programs. what were the average inflationary costs of health care before we created medicare and medicaid? they ran the same as every other aspect of our inflation. in other words, there was no differential between health care costs. now that we have a government program, what has happened is health care costs are two, sometimes three times the rate of the average inflation in the economy. so what you did
>> according to a group of open government advocates, the obama administration's efforts and government transparency are mixed. the sunlight foundation held a forum on whether president obama lifted to his pledge to have the most open government in american history. this discussion is 90 minutes. >> good morning. welcome to the kayseri committee and transparency event on transparency in the obama presidency. i am daniel schuman with the sunlight foundation. welcome. there are many meanings of transparency. i'm not going to get into all of them today, but i'm sure there will be many different aspects. their widely divergent opinions on the successes of the obama administration and i hope to explore some of those today. president obama made a number of promises when he was running for president. a number are still available on during the course of the administration, new issues came up. everything from campaign finance disclosure to dealing with the lawsuit and others on visitors logs. there's been a lot of changes during the course of the administration. what i
.the government sold out during the course of the year several months ago. what i did was when i originally released them the price $429 at keep the original issue price in the 2011 set when we brought that out the original issue price was $429. i have that cory set now and if you go to is $1,299.95. the 2006 sater --t i sold it for a hundred $99it is $1,299. those are the other to reverse print sats and they both haveonly one that has a silk san francisco mint mark san francisco mint makes other coins and the only did it because it was commemorating the san francisco mint so they might do in 25 years for the hundredth anniversary but not for the 77th anniversary. we have when more anniversaries and the government is doing a lot of other cool ones like next year the doing commemorative dollars of all the five starred generals and american history. it is windy very cool. >>host: this is the one you said was a hundred dollars? >>guest: we've done 3 revere spruce the 2011 set. it is about $800 the 20th anniversary set is about $800 and this coin iss rare as the only but is the
. they can even take care of their own bodily functions and they want to change the government. if you can't be, you can't change anything you stupid, stupid jerks. anyway. [applause] the chapter, focus on how basically the media demonizes the tea party and lionizes occupy wall street. i will get into why they did it later in the third hour of the speech. other areas, everybody has a border but if you talk about a border you are a racist. grant has a border. they don't deserve one that they have one. [laughter] our military is treated on campus with intolerance. if you organize a care package delivery to afghanistan they will be professors and activist groups who say, why are we sending stuff to people who kill babies? i don't get it. i don't have anything beyond that those people are idiots because they allow people like bill maher to speak so they give accolades to tears when he is a terrorist if they get no respect to our troops. there's a chapter in my book on that. conservative women, any women? [applause] you have the toughest job because feminists hate you and they go out of their w
be back. even i can figure that one out. here is the mint said starter collection a regional government packaging and you have it on price break this morning. this is a huge set . >>guest: e have done a price break on this and we do not have very many of these. >>host: i want to let everyone know, we have over a hundred of those and that can sell within this presentation but we do have 40 years of the proof from 1960-2000.this is a holiday pricing. we took $200 off of this. >>guest: extremely limited, we have about 60 of those left. >>host: a lot of the offers we have to with you this morning are extremely+ when you see if you want to see them underneath the christmas tree, hear with quinn collector, we do have the extended return policy, and took in three 31st and that is a great opportunity. that is what happened out and the cleaner world. >>host: this is the independence half dollar $129.953 flexible payments3 of4 in this is a historical claim. >>guest: the never presented this. and this is from this is a brilliant uncirculated, this is the centennial, and this is the 150t
. bottom line, i think, it's no way to govern. it is a giant mistake to have all of this in a pool of ambiguity, and as i understand it now, you would know more. i mean, it truly is a stalemate. they are not talking. >> now, you point out that it's the same player, and, i think, you'll agree player that is matter most are the president, speaker boehner. what do we know about the personal relationship that might illuminate what's going on right now? >> well, they started out last year when they were working on the debt ceiling, and they had what are calledded the merlot and nicorette's meetings. in other words, boehner would have a merlot, and obama would chew nicorette. >> you point outside in the book somehow when they took the official photo, both of those vanished. >> yes. they had iced tea there for obama. of course, boehner had his seg represent, and they put the cigarette in the ashtray away for the picture, but they have not closed the deal on the personal relations, and that's a shame. i think if somebody, instead of sponsoring your breakfast and all, sponsor a weekly dinne
market share, which meets the lower cost and more prosperity. this is both for the government, which also administers price is. they are called taxes. so lower tax rates expand the economy and we need more revenues for the government and less zero-sum struggles over government favors. >> we been talking books tv but george gilder, author of several books with the new addition of george gilder, which came out originally in the early 80s. this is a tv on c-span 2. >> now i program from the up to the archives. fatima bhutto kameny said former pakistani prime minister, benazir bhutto, talks about growing up in a family powerbrokers. may suffer chronicles her close relatives including her own father who were assassinated by political. benazir bhutto was sworn in as prime minister of pakistan on december 2nd come in 1888. this is about an hour 15. >> back at home this evening. in the kitchen cooking at winning to my parents bedroom and sat as they watch television on the bed. he was a little child then in this so easy to take care of. we were lazily watching boston's ace, a show made in the 19t
is in the south and that population is also in the need of services. the government hasn't included both in the delivery of services as well as the governments of the country the people of the north and although we have implemented programs in the north unless there is a connection between the government and individuals, the programs are not going to have the effect of people feeling as though they are a part of society. and so, there was an effort planned over the last couple of years where the development partners in tandem with the government, the central government would deliver resources to the north again with a government out in the lead and with the donors supporting. unfortunately, the pace of that was too slow and not very effective. another point moving forward i think is that we do need to concentrate on decentralization and making a connection between the government services and the individual what the community level. >> to build further on the comments about the resource base within the mali clearly there are difficult choices for the government there that are involved in
replaced by government propaganda. i had grown up readingern necessary hemmingway and poetry and now i had to face propaganda eight hours a day and i was 14 years old. what do you think when having fun becomes illegal? how political can a 14-year-old get? but you the 14-year-old becomes political. that was the basis of all the protests that began in iran as early as 1980. now, sharia law came into iran very early after the revolution, and under sharia law democracy and freedom of the citizen is impossible. the thing of sharia law that govern iran in 1979 and 1980 are still in place. they're have something cosmetic changes here and there depending on what administration is president of iran. if you wore nail polish you could get away with it. but does that really make a big difference? does that mean that iran becomes free and independent are in khamenei? no. under this constitution freedom and democracy in iran is impossible. i'm sure you all know about the american hostages. everybody knows about that. but just after those hostages were released, i was in prison in iran, and at the time w
emerging economy. we asked about the report the government makes for business and enterprise. it is fair to say that his answer has captured the imagination of all political parties that will respond formally in the spring. so here's what we will do now. first, government spending should be alone with the business community. we will provide new money to support the partnerships. from april 2015, the governmental elites one of the funding and get people back to work. the gross funds are having businesses get back into the game. we are going to support businesses and technologies where britain has a clear technology advantage. we will extend our global lead in aerospace and support the supply chain for advanced infection. we've also support british companies to new emerging markets in asia and africa and the americas. and increasing the funding for the uk by over 25% a year. so they can help more firms build the capacity of overseas british chambers and maintain our country's position as the number one destination in europe for foreign investment. we are launching a new 1.5 billion pounds
as an individual project. this strategy is called regional government man to rent this one that deserves more attention. madam chair and colleagues, i think you've concluded your draft of water resources bill in which i appreciate and i hope we can address that later this year. unfortunately, other areas where this will protect it and saw. this first photo -- this is a new bridge over the indian river inland. you can ask the atlantic ocean to the delaware. that's a new bridge could be spent over $200 million on the bridge in the last several years. a lot of federal money, quite a bit of state. this is the old bridge. it disappeared. it's gone. this is a highway to the old bridge. ron. four months ago people make their way up and down the east coast. today the bridge is completely gone along with highway approaches. the new bridge are threatened and we want to make sure we've made a $200 million investment that we don't use the bridge. until the bridge can work underwater. unfortunately you can't get to the bridge and the beaches of rio to the easter pÂtÉ densities to be there argonne and th
in renewable energy has fallen by a half since this government came to power. would the chancellor not agree with me that what we need is to look to the future and to invest in the green jobs? and to that end, will be see to it, the 2030 decarbonization target in the energy bill -- companies in this country and recommended by the climate change committee? >> well, the first thing i would say is that this government has introduced -- making investmen investments, introducing the carbon price goal which is recognized around the world as a very effective way of ensuring a decarbonization market driven way of our economy, and we've just published an energy bill and to let the control framework that would allow for new renewable investment to the rest of this decade. the industry has that, alongside the cast strategy. on the decarbonization target, as they say we're going to take a power in the bill to set a target but that would be a decision for after the next carbon budget which happens in 2016. that is a perfectly sensible and rational approach to take. >> cannot congratulate the chancellor o
and operation. you're dealing with deployment of governance, development of projects that extend governance. and then the security framework, we come the afghan people, and oh, by the way, inside with all this there's a lot of people are very contentious. what i call capital t. taliban, little key taliban and different insurgent groups and transnational terrorist groups. just this morning. so this battalion task force, we were given this mission about 2009 and we're going to deploy an approximate 2010. so as i came on board, the battalion and brigade had been to iraq three consecutive tours. and so the shift was intuitive. there were some germane lessons to be learned and transferred to afghanistan, but not everything. in iraq, and having served in iraq it's different when you have an almost second world infrastructure. they had a technical class of people. every september, books would be shipped out of baghdad. there was a system in place for a lot of bureaucratic and government means. they had a history of forming as a government. which we didn't have that in afghanistan. you didn't have
last point is the u.s. writ large, the government and also civil society organization and others are largely standing on the sideline here. bob's organization put out an excellent report last week people should look at my organization. usip data private study. right now u.s. policy, also civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here or there was a desire among local forces including younger islamists who want to bring about changes in their political movement in for the large purse sitting on the sidelines here we need to do more. >> we need to move on to the q&a portion here. a few questions from the audience. if you have a question, research and peer to microphone circulating. 10 minutes before we begin to wrap a. >> my name is -- [inaudible] -- washington d.c. what's missing on discussions is the fact that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face the people. i wrote an article about this, who are very different than their fathers and grandfa
of the entire u.s. government, including policy, diplomacy, trade and of course security and that the area i work in. for me, the rebalanced has been and continues to be the strength of the relationships, adjusting our military posture and presents and employ new capacities to ensure we continue to effectively and efficiently contribute to the stability of the asia-pacific as we protect u.s. national interests. of course the keys to success of the innovative access agreement, greatly increased exercises, rotational presence increases come efficient force posture in yesterday's will maximize the dollars given to spend. also by putting our most capable forces forward as always her newest, most advanced equipment, to ensure we effectively operate with our allies in part or as across a wide range of operations as we worked together for peace and stability. i was asked to keep his opening remarks a little shorter than the last time so i can get your questions. i picked to finish up with a couple of thoughts. rebalances based on the strategy of collaboration and cooperation, not containment. the u
government in the nation of mali, our ally. this may seem inconsequential to the average american, but it could have big implications for our security as well as that of our regional and global allies. because in the power vacuum that was created in that spring coup, al qaeda saw an opportunity and they stepped in. three different extremist groups all linked to or controlled by al qaeda in the islamic magra known as aqim now control an area the size of texas in the northern part of mali. they succeeded in fracturing a formerly stable democracy and contributing to broad security, political and humanitarian crises that i believe have grave implications for the region and for america's interests. to put it simply, mr. president, this matters. mali, a relatively strong democracy for more than two decades, is now embroiled in turmoil. the united states in partnership with the international community must show leadership in helping it rebuild its democracy and restore its territorial integrity by reclaiming it from terrorists. so thi this morninges as the chr of the african chair subcom
government? why would he be doing this? >> well, i think the professor reason is probably do it in conjunction with the anniversary or, on the 17th which is, widely reported in the paper, in the newspapers, but, you know, our assessment is that their desire to continue down this road is motivated by their desire to ensure that their capability, they are now a self-proclaimed nuclear state, their ability to be able to demonstrate to the world that they have the capacity to be able to build missile and have in the technology to be able to use it in ways of their choosing down the road. and this as i said earlier would be very destabilizing i think to not only to the region, but to the international security environment. so who's helping them and my assessment of their ability to be able to launch this missile? i think that they have progressively gained better technology over time, and they have progressively gained that through a number of methods over a number of years and decades. to the degree that they will be more successful than they were last time, in such a short perio
to small city governments, county governments doing local research to document, his goal was to document every single person executed in this country. one of the persons that espy piled information on was the youngest person to be executed in the united states in the 20th century. and if you think about the history of capital punishment, some themes draw out. one of the themes is the execution of children. this has been debated, and ideas and perspectives have been given on this, is it right to execute children. another theme is, is it proper to execute people who are mentally ill? another issue that is drawn out in the history of capital punishment is the factor of race in determining sentencing of capital punishment. it's been statistically proven by david ball discuss and others that race is a mitigating factor in capital punishment sentencing. so these themes of race, of executing the young, executing the mentally ill are some of the themes that you can draw out of the collection. so here we have george stinney. george was 14 years old when he was convicted of killing an 11-year-old
laissez-faire to a powerful market governance in the public interest. from dishonest prices to honest ones, from commodification to protection of the commons. in the corporation from shareholder primacy to stakeholder primacy. from one ownership and motivational model to new business models involving alternative forms of ownership and to the democratization of capital. in money and finance from wall street the main street, from money created through bank debt to money created by government. in economic growth from today's growth fetish to postgrowth society from mere gdp growth to growth in human welfare and in democratically-determined priorities. in social conditions from economic insecurity to security for vast inequities to fundamental fairnesses from joblessness to good jobs for all who seek them. in indicators from gdp, grossly distorted picture, to accurate measures of social and environmental health and the quality of life. in consumerism from consumerism and influenza to sufficiency and mindful consumption, from more to enough, from owning to sharing. in communities from runaway e
with all designated persons connected to the iranian government. it bans trade and commodities used, it is designed to stop iran from busting sanctions by receiving payment in gold or using oil payments in local currency to buy gold. we have got to stop an effort to water down these sanctions. i say that because i remember the votes in the past, i remember our effort on the central bank. it was only because we got unanimous votes because we got so much sport that we were able to deploy those. let me add there's another portion of the amendments here that targets the regime for their human rights abuses and i think one of the areas where we have really been short, for those of you who talked to those who have been in the prisons, who have experienced the torture, seen the murder, experience the rapes, those are routine. iranian officials are involved in that activity but also in massive corruption preventing humanitarian assistance, food and medicine from reaching the iranian people, they are the beneficiaries of some of this and this new amendment would authorize the administration
-evaluation. conservatism is an asset, not a liability, as we try to govern this country in the 21st century. and i look forward to staying in touch with jim and to working with him at the heritage foundation to see what we can do to improve the fate of our country so we will not become greece. no one is more worried about this nation's unsustainable debt situation than senator demint. i've seen him deinvolve over time to someone who could just not sit quietly, who had to take up the cause. in the 2010 election cycle, he was one of the strongest voices this he had would a lost our way -- that we'd lost our way in washington. jim is a kind, sincere man, an individual who is a joy to be around. when it comes to what's going on in america, jim understands that if we don't make some changes we're going to lose our way of life. that's what's driven him above all else, to try to keep our country a place to be place where you can be anything. i look forward to working with jim in the private sector. from a personal point of view, we've had a great ride together. it has been fun. it has been challenging, and i
about pesticides and whether the government would do anything about it. whether that to the question, there is a host of questions that turned out not to be emulated, although it seems that the time. several reporters asked about the increase in soviet shipping traffic to the island of cuba and nobody knew what was happening or what that meant, but in a couple of a couple of our most vivid know exactly what that was about. that was not in the ad and related to a person was talking about in "silent spring." i hope you could also hear the president referred to this carson spoke. we are going to look into this problem, especially in light of this carson spoke. what's interesting about that is in 1962, no further introduction was needed. everybody knew who this person was. those racial%, celebrated author three books about the ocean on the beautiful lyrical books about the ocean. wonderful, transforming experiences for readers. carson had a way of taking science and translating it to beautiful narrative that everybody could relate to. so should become one of america's most celebrated and
to that position which hadn't existed before in the united states government, assistance secretary of the navy. >> there had been something called a chief clerk for years, but the idea of having an assistant secretary, what would be the point of that? there's nothing for him to do. and the job of chief clerk had already been promised elsewhere, and lincoln was told, but we can't -- >> but o do you assessment of naval commanders in chief. >> i believe both secretaries of the navy were very competent, and i would disagree they had little experience. i think being a salvage lawyer in key west and chairman of the naval committee was a lot of experience for mallory, and gideon welles had a lot of experience, the navy at the time was administered by a series of bureaus, steam engineering and so forth. and he was the bureau of clothing and provisions. which means he was the logistics guy for the navy. he was the only civilian to have that guy. everybody else was a navy captain. it would be like having somebody on the joint chiefs of staff who was in a civilian suit. so he really did have some experie
to come together to the two branches of government to rebuild our differences for the betterment of all. one thing about every single member of congress that raise their hand and support the constitution of the united states, just going to in a very simplified way read the preamble which says it all if we are to remove the uncertainty that this great republic can and will govern itself and in that way held the world. we have to go back to this. we would form a more perfect union and a stylish justice and so forth, tranquility, provide for the defense. that's what we are talking about. providing for the common defense in a carefully measured way. and second, promote the general welfare. it's not just the welfare of the head of his or the have nots. it's the general welfare of all citizens of this country. and secure the blessings of liberty under the constitution. members ought to simply read that and say to themselves what can i do? while our press release says they should communicate with the people. but i would like to pose a challenge because here is some of it, and i thank each of y
self-evaluation. conservatism is an asset, not a liability, as we try to govern this country in the 21st century. and i look forward to staying in touch with jim and to working with him at the heritage foundation to see what we can do to improve the fate of our country so we will not become greece. no one is more worried about this nation's unsustainable debt situation than senator demint. i've seen him deinvolve over time to someone who could just not sit quietly, who had to take up the cause. in the 2010 election cycle, he was one of the strongest voices this he had would a lost our way -- that we'd lost our way in washington. jim is a kind, sincere man, an individual who is a joy to be around. when it comes to what's going on in america, jim understands that if we don't make some changes we're going to lose our way of life. that's what's driven him above all else, to try to keep our country a place to be place where you can be anything. i look forward to working with jim in the private sector. from a personal point of view, we've had a great ride together. it has been fun. it has be
it is already achieving some result outside of the federal government. the health care can harness simplicity, has sustainability, even if the health care system undergoes some significant transformations. first, but to take a moment and talk about ohio and cleveland and how they're addressing some of these large issues here locally. particularly a recently announced demonstration of integrating care for coverage for the dual eligible. the dual eligible or individuals covered by medicare and medicaid. i don't know if you know this, but dual eligible operation represents 20% of the medicare population today and 31% of the cost. with excited to be part of this program under the strategic partnership with the company in dayton called care stories will be serving beneficiaries in cleveland and akron and youngstown. our partnership with care stories our ability and also appliquÉd conditions and their experiences being the leader in serving underprivileged people in health care for the last 23 years. it is this type of partnership designed to integrate care and simplify the health care experience
our government to take health from the list of luxury to be bought only with money and add it to the list containing inalienable rights of every citizen. we don't know whether franklin roosevelt ever heard about florence greenberg's unprecedented call for health care as a right. even though he had endorsed the conference, he chose to go on vacation. fdr was actually on a cruise. i guess we can't really blame him, pretty well deserved vacation the three years earlier, fdr had refused to include medical coverage as part of the social security act because he did not want to antagonize the american medical profession. he did send a message of support to the conference but not long afterward the outbreak of world war ii force the president's attention elsewhere. five years later on january 11th, 1944, in his state of the union address roosevelt spoke to the american people about the war and especially about the kind of peace the allies planned to establish after the defeat of fascism. one supreme objective for the future can be summed up in one word, security. and that means not
of fema testifies on capitol hill about the government's response to hurricane sandy. and later, senate debate on the u.n. treaty for the disabled. ♪ ♪ >> this weekend on c-span3's american history tv, follow harry truman easeleddest grandson to hiroshima as the city prepared to mark the bombing of the city in 1945. >> you know, everybody has their own view what happened, and i, i don't, i don't want to argue survival with anyone in japan about the history. i think we're past that. my whole purpose for being here is to listen, to honor the dead, to listen to the living and to see -- to do what i can to see this doesn't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us sunday at 9 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> now, a discussion of how the military and national security might be affected by spending cuts scheduled to take effect the first of the year. part of the so-called fiscal cliff. former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, was joined by the chairmen of the senate house armed services committee. this is a little less than an hour. >> good afternoon. thank
favorite and this -- the government only made them 1983-1997.what they decided to do to make it special was doing commemorative+ dollar and they put the set together and in this little case here and a solid as a prestige proof set and they just said it was a special proof set at the time. they did it againcommemorative dollars in all of the sets are silver so there is a tremendous intrinsic value in the sets as well as nearly a pound of silver is in the cents. then in 1985 they did not do and they decided they were really popular so let's revamp this and they to do a commemorative dollar ended in 1986 and change the packaging and holiday prestige proof set. in 1986 for the commemoration of the statue of liberty they did the statue of dollar that all proof set from the u.s. government go in this as well. new look at this for $1,699 and you get all of thisre kennedy half dollar proof sets and remember the that is $34.50 and $56.50 and $34.95 and $55.50 etc.. they're all valuable also is all the dollars and everything else. there is the constitution dollars of 1987 and 1988 is another ol
. they can't even take care of their own bodily functions and they want >> the government. if you can't p you are not changing anything, you stupid stupid jerks. anyway. the chapter -- two chapters on that. i focus on how the media demonized the tea party and lionized occupy wall street. i will get into why they did it later in the third hour of the speech. other areas, everybody has a border but if you talk about a border you are a racist. grant has a border. they don't deserve one but they have one. our military is treated on campuses with in tolerance. if you organize a care package delivery to afghanistan there will be professors and students and activists groups who say why are we sending stuff to people who care -- kill babies. i don't get it. i don't have anything beyond those people are idiots because they allow people like bill heirs to teach. they give accolades to terrorists yet they give no respect to our troops. there's a chapter in my book on that. conservative women, any -- you have the toughest job because feminists hate you and they go out of their way to demonize you even th
says liberalism as we define it is what you find in government and the federalist papers and john mill and tocqueville and all these, mostly guys i'm afraid, that's what liberalism is. then you can start constructing an idea that can compete with islamists. because islamism basically says we stand for just a. every islamist party is -- justice or freedom party, just as this, justice of that. how do you, how do you offer a competing level position in the arab world that can stand up against that? i don't think we are -- throw money at our have some program or some covert action. we need to approach the issue with some sense philosophically. the reality is there's racial we can do except protect against the interest we currently have in the region. weekend for the next 30 or 40 years think about how you create can't trace of general liberals who may someday run the country. i grew up in mexico. very briefly. mexico was a horrible backward authoritarian place with his loser presidents, and all of a sudden you get guys like fox and calderÓn, and where did they come from? they have a
is the minister, the father is the father, the sun is the son and jeff government. so if everyone in his, and i should say or her place though confucianism doesn't leave much fun for the element. and that within the region and with the world as china looks at, a sense of harmony, japan would be law, that sense of harmony and how you would achieve it is that their frustration is that the work is not just acquiescing to the notion that they are a rich country, that they are returning, that they're powerful, that they want respect. and they want to see the world kind of step back and give it greater latitude, but doesn't see this. this is what i think whether i personally think we are on a collision course. because when you look at what china's expectations of the world are, you also look at its paranoia, you look at jim, i'd love to hear utah, you're such an expert insider, what's going on in the cyber world. you see something which seems hard to me, despite her best efforts in not one to replace history, that the rise of a great power usually and often leads to messiness. usually and often leads
down the government in april of 2011 cutting discretionary spending by billions of dollars and they came to another one on the debt ceiling as well which was a 2.2 trillion dollar long-term reduction in exchange for an increase in the debt ceiling. so, you know, the need to take it to another level. this is a more complex problem, and it's the beginning of a series of negotiations between the two. they are going to be together for the next four years. the president won the election, the republicans won the house and frankly are not likely to lose the election in the second term presidency. so john boehner is active to be speaker the next four years hopefully this is the beginning of a productive relationship. >> host: you made some news last week -- >> guest: not intentionally. [laughter] >> host: when you said republicans should agree with the president, go ahead and extend the tax cuts for 98% of americans and fight leader on for extending those tax cuts for wealthier americans. given what was put out by speaker boehner yesterday, did that change your position? >> guest:
and other public events. thank you for writing to the military and to our government, complaining about these conditions. thank you for donating to these events, volunteering courage to resist and the bradley manning support network. most of all, he won me to thank you for caring, caring about him. the data we have waged for the last two years could not have been fought without your help and it has been a hard fight so far. we are currently have 450 exhibits in this case and that amounts to just over 20,000 pages of written notions and attachments. i am confident that the time this comes to a conclusion, the record of trial will be the longest record of trial and paramilitaries history. that record will reflect one thing, that we find at every turn, at every opportunity and we fought to ensure that brad received a fair trial. [applause] my office website can keep track of a few things to know what to share some numbers with you that i personally, i guess i'm happy to see. that is over 764,000 people to date have gone and read at least something about brad my webpage. we received over 70
for the disabled worldwide is to be active in this. [inaudible] many of these in the government do little bras little for their people. they often corrupt government i think the state department should strengthen its outreach in this important area and even drafted a statute law that required them to establish a department within their agency. they have is on their goals, but i don't think it domino leadership, and i think that is the way the government normally runs on here. you have a secretary of state, the president of the united states, and the secretary said certain priorities. you have to raise the level of priorities with the disabled. i truly believe that. i have a real clear vision. a vision of people when you have computer and a blind person with a disability or the a person with weakened vision can read it or the computer can talk to them. they talk to the computer and it talks back. it's not that expensive. that is one thing that we ought to be doing is advancing and ensuring that the equipment and devices and treatment better life transforming are given more emphasis by governmen
those governments are we believe that is their long-term goal. iran has been involved in terrorism as we know for some time. it's partly unique in that area. we have seen the i-beam regime operating through organizations such as republican guard and employ such tactics around the globe including right here in washington, d.c. however, the proximity of the south caucasus to iran as well as strong relationship with armenia, azerbaijan and georgia. have with both of the united states and israel, it increases the appeal of the iranians for targeting those countries. i applaud those governments in the region for the vigilance against the iranian threat. however, i'm particularly concerned about the security at the u.s. embassy as the agent location of the facility leave our people there particularly vulnerable. i often find myself comparing the geopolitics of the south caucasus to accordion not. a tangle of current events of these countries in the region isolated from their neighbors. unfortunately, such isolation can blame to the hands of hours laying on the periphery of the region. press re
. >> who was prime minister? ishkol. he had been in an opposition party for the government. bengurian had been a very big critic of the israeli government. >> was it a coalition government? >> a coalition government but not with him in it. >> who was the chief of staff of the military? >> yitzhak rabin. it was some very let eupblgous personalities in this government. there was the national religious party which today is a pretty outspoken right wing party. then it was an outspoken left wing party. there were the party that was in many ways so far left wing it came around and was right wing. sort of labor hawks. >> who ran jordan? >> king hussein. >> who ran syria? >> there was a doctors government. they had doctors in psychology or philosophy. there was a bathist regime, a radical, marksist regime that had a front of the civilian government. behind it was a military hunta in which the principle figure was rathar. >> king hussein's son is in control now. >> right. >> did they get involved in the 1967 war, the saudis? >> they sent a force to the border saying they would join but didn't join
-author of this book, the spirit of compromise, white governing demands it and campaigning undermines it. president, are we a politically compromising nation? >> we were created in compromise. a lot of people think of the revolutionary war, which separated us from our mother country, but if you recall, i know you weren't there then, but if you recall it -- historically speaking our founding fathers crafted a compromise that created the constitution. they were as polarized as any set of americans who had been throughout our country and history. there were a pro and anti slavery and yet they compromised. so, yes, we were founded in compromise. today compromise has become more difficult than ever before. >> what do you mean when you talk about the uncompromising mindset? >> well, we live in an era that has been characterized as a permanent campaign where every day is election day. and campaigning and elections make for uncompromising line sets. you stand on your principles to mobilize your base, draw in endless amounts now of money. the 24 / seven news cycle covers politics as if it is a horse race in
't require our federal or state governments or courts to take any action. there's no threat to the united states or our sovereignty from the committee. with respect to abortion, this is a disabilities treaty, and has nothing to do with abortion and doesn't change our law on abortion in any way. trying to turn this into an abortion debate is wrong on substance and bad politics. as to the united nations, i've heard people people say that ratifying the convention would take decisions out of parents' hands and let the u.n. or the federal government decide what's best for our children and that's just wrong. the treaty doesn't give the federal government or any state government new powers. with regard to children with disabilities and the treaty cannot be used as a basis for a lawsuit in state or federal court. former attorney general dick thornburgh made this crystal clear in his testimony before the senate foreign relations committee and in every conversation i've had with him. i would support the treaty if -- i wouldn't support the treaty if it were any other way. let's take a step back and
is obsessed because it is with the honor of government service. he believes inflation undermines trust in government that the government will not abuse the rights as citizens to print money. this is the most overlooked but fundamental item for the evil of inflation. trust brings me to the lesson of the book to enjoy the benefits of consuming more than we produce because the world uses the dollar has international money. there are many reasons for the supremacy but the most fundamental is to not debate the concert -- currency by inflating the would be sore the tested going forward and thus we get the long term employment budget under control. i show ultimately he controlled inflation by refusing to monetize the budget deficit. the problem began october 79 to drive down inflation from 12% down of 4% by 1982 it was down at 4% but the final victory for interest-rate after congress passed a balanced budget amendment called the gramm-rudman go the proposed draconian cuts in government spending less congress passed a balanced budget. sound familiar? one of the sponsors of the bill said it was
at the federal government and he gets the federal government to come in the federal government brings archaeologist. they find some stuff but in the end, and historian in team of archaeologists writes his this paper. they write the official congressional report and they say that the maryland regiment was truly brave and while they did this you know, tremendous, this important thing, it is no more important than anything anyone else did in the war. something to that effect which you know, i mean you could just see jamie kelly saying oh my god, please note don't let this be the report but you can also just sit there and say wow, whose actions are more important than his other actions in who gets to judge? he gets even sadder for me, so, but somebody is recently talking about trying to find the site again and i knew and historian who is trying to get the sonar so maybe someday they will. >> to me, it's undeniable the amnesia, knowing new york city history as a hopeless claim and he you just get more depressed all the time. is it just a trump principle that real estate takes precedence ov
and he stayed involved working for the american government. those three were very seriously injured early in their time in north africa, which is in a way why they survived. >> rachel cox, this is your book, "into dust and fire: five young americans who went first to fight the nazis." we didn't want to give voice to much of the indian. we gave away a little of it. rachel cox has another uncle who became rather notorious, and that is who? >> archibald cox to everyone in my family called him uncle bill. nobody knows why. that was his nickname. maybe just didn't like being called archie, i don't know spent so you called him uncle bill? >> yes. >> he is well-connected to the watergate era. what do you remember about that era? >> well, i think the general feeling was that it was characteristic of him to resign when his put in a position. i guess he was fired actually. he didn't resign, but anyway, he left. he wouldn't be with the president told him to do what he felt it to be illegal and against his convictions. and he left. so it kind of fits with what uncle robbie did. they're a family who
job of -- a limited government, free enterprise. we need to improve on the way we connect those policies to everyday lives of everyday people spent why has there been a failure? >> i'm not sure there's one issue for it but i'm not sure there's one reason for and i haven't had time to think about why this. but it needs to happen because i truly believe that principles we stand for are the only way, free enterprise limited government is the only way for us to stabilize and grow our middle class which is what we hope every american does. >> how worried are you of the consequences of the republican party -- [inaudible] >> i don't know about, even from the voters perspective? you mean changes in the demographic changes? you know, i'm not, i do think any voter in america, the our voters are locked into one party or the other, but the fastest-growing group of voters our voters are not in parties. what your looking for people who understand the issues ending anxieties they hope in the hopes they have. offer real and concrete policy solutions and a real role for government, appropriate r
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